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How to make a great pitch deck to raise funds with private investors

The idea here is to lay out the main keys to creating a good startup pitch deck, in order to raise money from Business Angels or VC funds.

The general format: About fifteen slides (roughly 10 to 20), rather text-light, with just a few clear, impactful messages and key figures.
- Slide 1: A large, beautiful image with your company's logo and its pitch in one sentence (this could be your business slogan, but generally it's a custom-made pitch, such as "Uber, but for driving schools").
- Slide 2: A slide summarizing the entire deck, which includes key figures and important facts to remember. Create this one last.
- Slide 3: The "team" slide, with partner/managers in the foreground (potentially with their degrees and careers) and key people underneath.
- Slide 4: The "problem" slide, which starts by summarizing the problem in your market in one sentence and details why and how it's a problem. Example: "sending money to Africa is complicated and/or expensive because...".
- Slide 5: The "solution" slide, which explains how your company meaningfully addresses the problem stated earlier. Example: "With our marketplace, customers can compare rates in a snap and order with one click."
- Slide 6: The slide that gives greater detail about the concept, product, service, etc.
- Slide 7: The market slide, with the number of potential customers for your product or services in France and/or Europe and/or the world. Example: "There are 12,000 driving schools in France and 1 million license candidates each year, each spending €1000 on average, which is a €1 billion annual market in France."
- Slide 8: The "business model" slide, which explains in clear and precise terms how the company generates revenue, on a unit basis. Example: "For an average transaction of €100, we take a 15% commission, i.e. €15, and also charge the supplier a fixed subscription fee of €50 per month."
- Slide 9: The "KPIs", which shows in a few figures (5 or 6 max) how the business comes out ahead. Example: "Our CAC (customer acquisition cost) is €30, our average cart is €300 with a gross margin of 50%, 150/30 = 5, so the ratio of gross margin/CAC is 5." Next, "A customer orders an average of three times a year from us, or stays subscribed for 7 months"...
- Slide 10: The "achieved" slide which shows the change in sales and the number of monthly or quarterly customers over the past 6-18 months.
- Slide 11: The "outlook" slide that shows revenue and customer forecasts over the next 24-48 months, with milestones like breakeven, entering new markets, hiring key people, launching new products, etc.
- Slide 12: The "competitive positioning" slide, which shows exactly how you're better than the competition. The goal: Show who your competitors are and how strong your value proposition is compared to them. Example: "In terms of customer processing speed, we beat our competitors B and C with a processing speed of X days rather than Y days."
- Slide 13: The "use of funds" slide that shows how much is being raised and for what purpose. Example: "We're raising €800k in equity + €400k in debt for customer acquisition on Facebook or SEO (40%), building up the tech team (40%), and creating the customer service team (20%)."
- Slides 14+: The appendices, with all the interesting data about your business: Key traffic figures and your conversion rates, market data, a spotlight on one particular customer, etc.

These features are a base, a skeleton, that answers 80% of the key questions an investor wants to see in a deck. Don't forget: The goal is to make him want to make an appointment to talk about the subject in more detail! This means you need to be clear and impactful to pass along key messages in a few minutes of reading time: "We're growing, our market is large and/or fragmented, what we bring to the table that our competitors don't, our team is skilled in addressing this issue and we know where we're going and how to get there..."

 

http://en.supercapital.fr/

 

These features are a base, a skeleton, that answers 80% of the key questions an investor wants to see in a deck. Don't forget: The goal is to make him want to make an appointment to talk about the subject in more detail! This means you need to be clear and impactful to pass along key messages in a few minutes of reading time: "We're growing, our market is large and/or fragmented, what we bring to the table that our competitors don't, our team is skilled in addressing this issue and we know where we're going and how to get there..."

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